Everyone has a place at the table in The Blind Kitchen!

Welcome to The Blind Kitchen where adaptive tools, helpful strategies, and specialized knowledge are provided to blind and vision-impaired people who want to cook safely, confidently, and independently.

We made the news …

Listen to Chef Debra’s recent interview with Brian McCallen host of Speaking Out for the Blind.


Best sellers and exclusive tools


Watch or listen to the video below to learn more.


Many believe it is dangerous for people who have vision loss to cook because it involves working with sharp objects and sources of heat.  This is not true!  I, along with thousands of others, am proof that people with vision loss can cook safely, confidently, and independently with the right tools and information.

Executive chef and founder

Chef Debra with pie earrings and a snowflake pin
Chef Debra Erickson

I am Debra Erickson, executive chef and founder of The Blind Kitchen. I am also blind and want to welcome you into The Blind Kitchen community where vision loss does not have to end your love of cooking. You just need to learn the adaptive tools and techniques to work around your vision loss. I am a culinary school graduate and a cooking instructor for blind and visually impaired adults and I am excited to share what I have learned on my culinary journey!

What The Blind Kitchen does

The Blind Kitchen ships practical adaptive cooking tools to blind and visually impaired cooks to assist with a safe, confident, and independent cooking experience in their own kitchens. We also provide blind-friendly tips and strategies for the many aspects related to cooking that do not involve a specific tool or kitchen equipment.

How does it work?

Subscribers to The Blind Kitchen will receive four themed collections of blind-friendly tools and equipment shipped directly to their homes. All items are labeled in large print and braille. Members will have access to The Blind Kitchen Library, which contains short audio-described video tutorials to teach what each tool does, why it is adaptive for cooks with vision loss, instructions and demonstrations as to how to use each tool, and tips for storing and caring for them. All items are practical and do not require any specialized training or equipment to use. Watch “The Collections Overview” video for more details on each of the collections.

The Blind Kitchen Collections

Each customer will receive four collections that contain 15 to 20 items that are specially curated for individuals who are blind and visually impaired.

Box 1: Kitchen Basics Collection

Measuring, portioning, setting up a safe and efficient work area, labeling, etc.

Box 2: Cutting and Chopping Collection

Items and techniques for safe use of sharp kitchen items

Box 3: Stovetop Collection

Items to cook safely on the stovetop and in the oven

Box 4: Oven Collection

Items related to specific cooking methods that involve heat

Bonus

Other items related to other cooking-related topics will also be included in each box.

The Blind Kitchen Library

The Blind Kitchen also serves as a repository of information from many sources on many aspects related to cooking with vision loss that are not associated with a specific piece of equipment or tool. These helpful tips include ways to safely manage hot cooking methods and safely use sharp tools. Cooking does not always start or end in the kitchen, and vision loss should not be a reason why we cannot perform other activities related to meal preparation.

Videos related to how blind and visually impaired people can organize their kitchen and pantry, identify food items in closed containers, label items in their kitchen and pantry, shop, access and read recipes, dine out and entertain guests with confidence and grace can be found in The Blind Kitchen Library where every video is audio described.

New content will be added to The Blind Kitchen website often.

Using an ice cube tray Debra Erickson demonstrates how to save and freeze flavoring in pre-measured portions.
Debra Erickson demonstrates how to freeze and save flavoring in pre-measured portions.

Latest from the Library

  • Speaking Out for the Blind
    It was a pleasure talking with Brian McCallen host of the Speaking Out for the Blind show. He was so warm and funny and put me at ease almost immediately.   Take a listen to learn a bit more about the journey and evolution of The Blind Kitchen and be sure to listen to Brian’s other… Continue reading Speaking Out for the Blind
  • Labeling clothing
    Chef Debra has over 30 chef coats in various colors and styles! Q) How is she able to select the one she wants if she can’t see them? A) She uses WayAround to label clothing and many other things as well. Debra can quickly, confidently, and independently know exactly which chef coat is which using… Continue reading Labeling clothing
  • Grand opening success!
    The Grand Opening of The Blind Kitchen was a big success! Held where all The Blind Kitchen videos are shot, Willamette Falls Studios, the grand opening featured a plethora of delicious food prepared by the chefs from Debra’s culinary school alma mater. The food looked almost too beautiful to eat – but we found a… Continue reading Grand opening success!
  • Using bump dots to label bottles and jars
    The quickest way to identify what is inside a jar or a bottle is to read the label. If that is not an option for you because of vision loss, the next quickest way is to read a Braille label that identifies the contents.  But many visually impaired people do not read braille. There are a… Continue reading Using bump dots to label bottles and jars
  • Cooking with tea bags
    Do you know there are literally thousands of tea bag flavors including herbs and spices? Some, like lavender and mint teas you are probably familiar with but there are so many more! I use flavored teabags to infuse flavor when I am boiling, simmering, and poaching. Some of the lesser-known tea flavors are oregano, thyme, star anise,… Continue reading Cooking with tea bags
  • Use rubber bands to shop
    When shopping in person in a store, having a stash of rubber bands on your wrist can be very helpful.  You can quickly slip a rubber band onto a can or box to help you to differentiate between items that are the same shape and size. For example, if I am buying 3 cans of soup:… Continue reading Use rubber bands to shop

Thank you

Thank you for your interest in The Blind Kitchen. For many of us, preparing delicious, meaningful, and nutritious meals for friends and family is a type of “love language.” Vision loss should not be a barrier to cooking, regardless of your position on the blindness spectrum. Everyone has a place at the table in The Blind Kitchen!